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Palazzo Blu in Pisa is putting on Andy Warhol: An American Story, an exhibition celebrating the Pop Art genius (www.mostrawarhol.it). Over 150 Warhol works will be shown through February 2014, covering the entire career of this artist who revolutionized the 20th century.


Andy Warhol, Skull, Acrylic on canvas, 1976 MUMOK, Vienna (Foto © museum moderner kunst stiftung ludwig wien, On loan from the Austrian Ludwig Foundation) © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts
Andy Warhol, Fiori, Oil on canvas, 1964. UniCredit Art Collection © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc., by SIAE 2013

The center of his extraordinary creative universe was The Factory, in the heart of Manhattan at 86 Broadway Street. He had a profound impact on the entire fashion and design world and his dramatic works gave the star system its cues. The Factory was a vast space for collective work, through which a colorful array of superstars passed. Its mission was multifaceted experimentation (everything from lithographs to screen prints and consumer items, clothes, film, and music), everything taken to an extreme.


Andy Warhol, Dollar Sign, 1981. Collection Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Nice © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, by SIAE
Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, by SIAE

Andy Warhol, Self-portrait, 1967. The Sonnabend Collection © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, by SIAE
Andy Warhol, Liz Taylor, 1964. The Sonnabend Collection © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, by SIAE

Edie Sedgwick was the unrivaled queen of the Factory. A model, actress and Warhol’s favorite muse, she perfectly embodied 1960s style with her skinny, androgynous frame, large eyes highlighted by fake eyelashes and smoky gray make-up, mini-dresses, and black tights, covered by leopard print coats, and never without her diva sunglasses. The storied Studio 54, the undisputed king of the New York night, put on legendary parties. Bottega Veneta‘s woven leather handbags were always hanging off Edie’s arm (and those of other stars too, such as Liza Minnelli, Bianca Jagger all habituées of Studio 54 events/nights). Bottega Veneta was one of the first Italian brands to make it in Manhattan in the late 1960s,  gaining acclaim for the quality of its materials and innovations. This naturally made it one of Warhol’s favorite brands; so much so, in fact,  that he would stock up with presents for his friends at the Fifth Avenue Bottega Veneta boutique and even produced a short film for them, in the early 1980s.


Edie Sedgwick and Andy Warhol