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Tastings and walks in the south of France

Provence has a millenary wine history. Its vineyards extend between sea and mountains, hills and picturesque villages, perched on the heights or on the shores of the Mediterranean.

The colors and smells of the wonderful lavender fields, the vineyards as far as the eye can see, lead the viewer on an exciting journey that will find full accomplishment in tasting the wines that this precious land offers.

The wines of Provence only recently, through a change in production strategies aimed at quality, have emerged in the French wine scene: for the wide range of rosé wines, but also for white and red wines.

From the gates of Nice to those of the Camargue, the Provence Wine Route includes more than 430 companies and wineries. The itinerary begins in Gigondas with the reds, passing through Avignon. We then continued towards Arles and finally in the South where fruity whites and rosés are produced. There the vineyards exploit the terraces on the coast as in the Ligurian coast.

Provence is a historical specialist in rosé wines, cultivation strongly rooted in the local wine-growing traditions. The climate, the land, the vines here favor its preparation. Provence also produces red wines for aging, full-bodied and generous, and white wines of great freshness and very aromatic.

Eight are the wine areas considered as Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée of Provence. Among these, the most representative are: Bandol, Cassis, Coteaux d’Aix-En-Provence et Les Baux-De-Provence and Côtes de Provence.

For lovers of white wines, the wines of the Côte du Rhone are extremely pleasant, still rigorously harvested by hand: the winemakers say they are the flat and smooth pebbles that cover the land, to give the grapes that typical body that distinguishes them. For those who prefer red wines instead, the robust Châteauneuf-du-Pape represents the best quality one, ideal for meat dishes, with its full-bodied aroma of black mourvèdre grapes, which enjoy a lot of sun to acquire the characteristic flavor.

The rosé wine in this land is something more than an aperitif wine. Specifically, the vin de sable of the Camargue is preferred, a vineyard that grows on the dunes and is strengthened with the sun, the wind and the salt.